Category: Steer feeding chart

Steer feeding chart

Commercial Cattle. Registered Cattle.

Raising Calf-Fed Holsteins: Feedlot Nutrition

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2017 Feed Composition Tables: Use this to mix your cattle feed rations

Easy to Use CattleMax is intuitive to use so it is not intimidating. Free learning classes and videos The CattleMax website features short, easy-to-understand online training videos that show you how easy it is to enter records and run reports.Get the best thinking of the most accomplished group of Ph. Purina Animal Nutrition. Now this package of potential show-winning genetics is yours — what can you do to maximize its potential with a cattle nutrition plan?

Be consistent in your feeding. Water drives feed intake, so making sure your animals are drinking is important, especially in hot summer months. Feed individually, but in a buddy system. Almost as important as balanced amounts of protein, energy, and fiber is companionship. May suggests feeding cattle separately, but putting the bunks side-by-side and separated by a fenceline so the cattle feel like they are eating with a buddy.

Evaluate the entire feed product line. Consider what goes into making that feed, including research and innovation, quality control, consistency, expertise and more. When you select a high-quality feeding program, you often get much more than just feed.

Make sure the pen matches the paper. The cattle pen, that is. Part of this includes weighing your cattle on a continuous basis, says May. May emphasizes that every animal and every feeding scenario is different. Having knowledge of what different feed products can do, then matching those to meet different needs is part of the equation.

Keep the end in mind. Most show cattle are fed to meet a certain goal by a particular date or series of dates. Determine what you want them to weigh, then create a plan to get there, the experts agree. This includes evaluating their past nutrition plane then building up to a feeding plan to meet the end goal.

And it needs to begin the day you start feeding your calf. And with all of the nutrition products available, you can maximize your cattle to be the best they can be, says Stierwalt. Related Education Content.

Specialty Pages.Dairy steers are an important source of beef production in the U.

Beef Cow Rations and Winter Feeding Guidelines

Since Holstein is the dominant dairy breed, emphasis is placed on finishing Holstein steers. Finished dairy steers and heifers account for Since Holsteins constitute 86 percent of the dairy cow population, Holstein steers and the few finished Holstein heifers are The marbling within Holstein beef can be extensive. The goal in finishing Holstein steers is to produce carcasses weighing to pounds that qualify for USDA quality grades Choice or Prime. Accomplishing this goal requires acknowledgement Holsteins have a large skeletal growth potential.

Holstein cows produce steer progeny that have large frame scores. Consequently, these large-frame steers are not likely to be finished until they weigh at least 1, pounds. Steers with a bodyweight of 1, pounds and a dressing percentage of 61 percent would yield a carcass of 1, pounds. Carcass weights in excess of 1, pounds incur carcass price discounts. The ideal live weight finished Holstein steers should achieve with 28 percent body fat is 1, to 1, pounds. This endpoint is achieved only when a high-energy finishing diet, containing at least 0.

Two steers were photographed to provide visual aid for readers. These are characteristics of a body condition score of 7, coinciding with the fat content of carcasses that qualify for the USDA Choice quality grade. A similarly finished Holstein steer is shown in Figure 2. Bull calf management through weaning should be no different than the management methods applied to heifer calves.

Unfortunately, bull calves often do not receive adequate colostrum. Long-term studies have not been conducted to specifically quantify the effects of no or insufficient colostrum on steer health or growth. However, such insufficiency is reported to have similar long-term negative consequences for dairy heifer calves. Castrate prior to or soon after weaning. The procedure should be done carefully. Castration by means of surgical removal of two testes is recommended.JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser.

You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. Updated: January 29, The United States is the leading beef producer in the world. Between 24 and 27 billion pounds of beef are produced annually in the United States. Beef consumption has been gradually decreasing since the s, when it was over 70 pounds per capita, to less than 55 pounds today.

While domestic consumption has been declining, foreign demand has been very strong with the U. Traditional cattle-feeding enterprises grow weaned calves to pounds and yearling steers or heifers to pounds to slaughter weights of 1, to 1, pounds. Cattle-feeding operations exist in all regions of the United States, but most large operations are in the Great Plains from Colorado and Nebraska to Texas. Most cattle-feeding operations are relatively small.

Over 95 percent of all operations have fewer than 1, head, but these small feedlots market around 15 percent of the cattle fed each year. In the northeastern United States, a mix of beef breeds, crossbreeds, or dairy beef mostly Holstein steers are typically finished in feedlots.

Cattle feeding is a high-risk business. During some years, an operation may not recover out-of-pocket costs. The beef industry is very cyclical and cattle prices can fall dramatically when beef operations reduce herd sizes because of drought and the high cost of feed. Entry into the cattle-feeding business usually has few restrictions. Although facilities range from small lots with a few head to modern facilities with more than 50, head, there are economies of scale in cattle feeding.

The cost of feeding per animal drops as the number of animals in the operation increases. Because of the high risks and the economies of scale that favor larger operations, beef feeding enterprises are not as well adapted to small-scale and part-time farms as are beef cow-calf operations. However, less land is required for a cattle-feeding operation than for a cow-calf enterprise. Thorough planning and preparation are essential for you to have a successful beef-feeding operation.

Operators should determine where they will obtain feeder calves, which feeds will be required to finish the cattle to desired market weights and grades, and what type of shelter will be needed because most feedlot cattle are on hand over the winter months. Feeders also should design a health program in cooperation with a veterinarian, decide what the starting and slaughter weights and grades should be, and assess marketing alternatives.

Feeding Options for Beef Cattle

Visit successful cattle-feeding operations to help determine what facilities are needed, such as a handling chute and head gate to properly restrain animals when they are vaccinated, implanted, or treated in a health program.

Various materials can be used for feedlot fences, including boards, wire panels, high-tensile wire, and steel cables. Barbed wire is not recommended.

A seven- or nine-wire high-tensile fence is one of the most economical barriers. Another effective fence is a combination of high-tensile wire which can be electrified with three or four 2-by- 6-inch planks spaced between the wires. Housing for feeder cattle does not have to be extensive or weather tight--open-sided sheds and more completely enclosed structures are equally effective.

Younger cattle require more shelter than older cattle, especially for protection from winter winds. All facilities should be designed for the number of cattle fed and include a good manure management program.

Most feedlots use concrete feed bunks that allow cattle to feed from one or both sides, although feed bunks of treated lumber also can be used. Feed can be delivered through a mixer wagon, conveyor with a belt or chain, or a bucket loader. To reduce mud, use concrete pads for areas around waterers and feed bunks. Mounds that are 3 to 5 feet high offer cattle relatively dry ground to rest on.

The feedlot area should be well drained with topsoil removed to expose clay or other fairly impervious surface.Dairy steers are an important source of beef production in the U. Since Holstein is the dominant dairy breed, emphasis is placed on finishing Holstein steers. Finished dairy steers and heifers account for Since Holsteins constitute 86 percent of the dairy cow population, Holstein steers and the few finished Holstein heifers are The marbling within Holstein beef can be extensive.

The goal in finishing Holstein steers is to produce carcasses weighing to pounds that qualify for USDA quality grades Choice or Prime. Accomplishing this goal requires acknowledgement Holsteins have a large skeletal growth potential. Holstein cows produce steer progeny that have large frame scores.

Consequently, these large-frame steers are not likely to be finished until they weigh at least 1, pounds. Steers with a bodyweight of 1, pounds and a dressing percentage of 61 percent would yield a carcass of 1, pounds.

Carcass weights in excess of 1, pounds incur carcass price discounts. The ideal live weight finished Holstein steers should achieve with 28 percent body fat is 1, to 1, pounds.

This endpoint is achieved only when a high-energy finishing diet, containing at least 0. Two steers were photographed to provide visual aid for readers.

These are characteristics of a body condition score of 7, coinciding with the fat content of carcasses that qualify for the USDA Choice quality grade.

A similarly finished Holstein steer is shown in Figure 2. Bull calf management through weaning should be no different than the management methods applied to heifer calves. Unfortunately, bull calves often do not receive adequate colostrum. Long-term studies have not been conducted to specifically quantify the effects of no or insufficient colostrum on steer health or growth.

However, such insufficiency is reported to have similar long-term negative consequences for dairy heifer calves. Castrate prior to or soon after weaning. The procedure should be done carefully. Castration by means of surgical removal of two testes is recommended.It may be necessary to supplement it with technical and personal advice relevant to individual circumstances.

A long dry summer followed by a late autumn break can result in producers going through winter with limited conserved fodder and limited available pasture. For producers with insufficient fodder to get through this winter a number of options are available. The first step is to sort cattle into different feed and management priority groups eg.

Low priority groups should be sold or agisted. Groups to agist would be those which do not need constant management. This option would need to be costed against other feed options. Groups which will need more immediate attention and feed are the cows rearing calves as well as trying to get in calf again.

Young replacement heifers will also need attention. A feed budget needs to be prepared to determine the feed requirement of remaining stock. Subtract from this expected pasturegrowth and fodder reserves. This will give an estimate of the feed deficit. If extra feed is needed to get remaining stock through winter, energy will be the main requirement.

Feed alternatives should be compared on their cost per unit of energy see Agriculture Note AG What feed options are the best buy? Some options are discussed below. Pasture growth will be the cheapest source of feed over winter and pasture height has a major effect on pasture growth.

As well as assisting in pasture growth, this will also give some height to pasture so that it can respond to nitrogen fertiliser. The cost of extra pasture produced from nitrogen fertiliser can be around half that of grain and one third that of hay assuming average responses from the fertiliser and depending upon changing commodity costs for fodder and fertiliser.

A typical response time is four to six weeks, so action needs to be taken early to use this option. Nitrogen needs to be used on responsive paddocks and these and other details for using nitrogen fertilisers are contained in Agriculture Note AG Using nitrogen to grow extra feed for cows.

If in doubt about the response you would get you could try a trial strip and see what happens. Hay at current prices is a very expensive feed source and grain can be a cheaper source of energy see Agriculture Note AG What feed options are the best buy. Care and planning needs to be exercised when using grain as a supplement for cattle and sheep. Grain needs to be introduced gradually into the diet building up to the desired level over several weeks.

Grain poisoning and death can occur when introduction to grain is too quick. Whole grain can be fed however if feeding any cereal grain other than Oats it is best to either crack or roll the grain to reduce wastage. Grain can be fed on the dry ground in small heaps or a long trail preferably behind a single electric wire or along a fenceline. However troughs should be used to reduce waste.

Grain could be used to stretch out valuable hay reserves, particularly if used before wet conditions in winter. Oats are probably the easiest grain to feed. There is less need to crush or crack the grain and the husks minimise the potential grain poisoning when being introduced.

steer feeding chart

Where hay is available a supplement of hay and grain is best, especially when introducing cattle to grain. For example, using 12 megajoule MJ grain and 8. Farmers considering grain feeding for the first time are advised to get experienced advice see Agriculture Note AG Hints on feeding grain to cattle.

Most commercial feedlots provide contract lot feeding services for finishing cattle for slaughter. An alternative is an on-farm opportunity feedlot see Agriculture Note AG Opportunity lot feeding of beef cattle. In either case, this needs careful budgeting see Agriculture Note AG Partial budgets: a tool for making better decisions. A guide to the daily feed requirements of beef cattle is shown in the table below.During these challenging times, we guarantee we will work tirelessly to support you.

We will continue to give you accurate and timely information throughout the crisis, and we will deliver on our mission — to help everyone in the world learn how to do anything — no matter what.

Thank you to our community and to all of our readers who are working to aid others in this time of crisis, and to all of those who are making personal sacrifices for the good of their communities. We will get through this together. You might think that feeding cattle is as simple as just putting some hay in front of them. However, the reality is that it involves knowing what feed is available, what and how much your cattle should be fed, and how that feed is going to affect the cattle's health and productivity.

In a nutshell, you need to think about your type of operation, location, finances, and personal preferences when feeding cattle. So much for just putting some hay in front of a cow! Increase food if. There are high winds in the area.

The pasture is very muddy so food is hard to find. Decrease food if Night cooling does not occur. Cattle need to eat a forage-based diet, so to feed your cattle, research your cattle's breed to find out what figure out their nutritional needs. Decide how much weight you want your cattle to gain each day by subtracting the cow's current weight from its ideal weight, and divide the difference by the number of days that you want to feed the cow to gain weight.

Choose a high-quality feed, like hay, grain, or straw, and work with a veterinarian to decide on a feeding schedule and feed rations. Did this summary help you? Yes No. Log in Facebook Loading Google Loading Civic Loading No account yet?

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steer feeding chart

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steer feeding chart

As the COVID situation develops, our hearts ache as we think about all the people around the world that are affected by the pandemic Read morebut we are also encouraged by the stories of our readers finding help through our site. Article Edit. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Co-authored by Karin Lindquist Updated: April 21, This article was co-authored by Karin Lindquist, a trusted member of wikiHow's community. She has over 20 years of experience working with cattle and crops.

She's worked for a mixed-practice veterinarian, as a sales representative in a farm supply store, and as a research assistant doing rangeland, soil, and crop research.


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